Monday, 11 May 2020 00:00

AchillesTendon Stretches

When someone experiences an Achilles tendon fracture, it is often accompanied by severe pain and discomfort. Some patients find it helpful to perform specific exercises following the initial treatment. This may help to strengthen the Achilles tendon and surrounding areas of the foot. Stretching the toes can be effective in lengthening the Achilles tendon. This is accomplished by pulling the big toe up and back while sitting in a chair. This tendon can also be stretched by standing on a step, and lowering the heel until it gently pulls in the back of the leg. If you have endured this type of injury, it is strongly suggested that you seek the advice of a podiatrist who can treat this ailment and guide you toward performing stretches that are correct for you.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 04 May 2020 00:00

Where Is The Cuboid Bone Located?

There are seven bones in the foot that are referred to as tarsal bones. The cuboid bone is included in this group, and it is located on the outside of the foot. An injury can cause the ligaments surrounding this bone to become inflamed, and this is known as cuboid syndrome. It can be a common injury among athletes, and can cause considerable pain and discomfort. It may happen as a result of frequently running for extended periods of time, or from medical conditions that can include flat feet. Recovery may often begin with eliminating the activity that caused the injury, followed by elevating the foot, which may help to reduce existing swelling. Some patients may find mild relief when the affected foot is taped, as this may offer additional stability as the healing process takes place. If you feel you may have cuboid’s syndrome, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat this condition.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 27 April 2020 00:00

A Common Method of Treating a Broken Toe

People who have experienced a broken toe can often attest to the pain and discomfort that often accompanies this type of injury. It may cause difficulty in walking, and common symptoms can include swelling and bruising. Many people have realized they may have broken their toes after dropping a heavy object on one or more of them, or if they have stubbed it on a piece of furniture. There are some patients who participate in running and jumping activities, and this may increase the chance of incurring a broken toe as well. Additional symptoms may include bleeding, and there may be a numbing or tingling sensation. When the fracture is mild, an effective form of treatment may consist of buddy taping. This is done by taping the injured toe to the toe next to it. This method typically helps the broken toe get the necessary support as the healing process takes place. If you have broken your toe, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible so the correct treatment can begin.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Sunday, 26 April 2020 00:00

Reminder: When Was the Last Time...?

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Monday, 20 April 2020 00:00

Possible Causes of Corns

Corns are small, thick, and hardened layers of skin that can grow inward on the bottom of the feet. Additionally, corns can form between the toes, and can cause general pain and discomfort. These typically occur as a result of wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, and can appear on the pressure points of the foot. Mild relief may be felt when there is a protective pad worn over the corn. Corns that are bigger, which alter the style of walking, may need to be removed by a podiatrist, who can also recommend wearing orthotics to help to prevent corns from developing in the future. 

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns and Calluses
Monday, 13 April 2020 00:00

How Can Using a Mirror Help My Feet?

A common concern among diabetic patients is wounds on their feet. Elevated glucose levels in the blood may cause a condition that is known as neuropathy, which may cause an inability to feel cuts and wounds that develop on the feet. A foot ulcer may develop as a result of this lack of sensation, which may cause severe pain and discomfort. Diabetic patients generally experience a slower healing process, which is why it is important to properly take care of any existing wounds. Performing daily foot checks is vital for proper foot care management. This can be accomplished by having a caretaker thoroughly check the bottom of your feet, or by possibly looking at a mirror that is under the feet. If you have wounds on your feet for any reason, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 06 April 2020 00:00

Treatment Methods for Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis may occur when the two sesamoid bones in the foot become inflamed, typically due to an injury. Repeated trauma or pressure placed on the ball of the foot is a common reason for this condition to develop. Dancers and basketball players are more likely to develop sesamoiditis due to the nature of their sport and the pressure often placed on the ball of the foot. For your sesamoids to recover it is imperative to reduce that pressure. Some ways to alleviate the pressure on the balls of your feet are by using foot inserts, a hot and cold foot roller, or metatarsal pads. For professional advice and a proper diagnosis, it’s suggested that you speak with a podiatrist.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 30 March 2020 00:00

Possible Types of Heel Pain

Heel pain is a common ailment among patients who enjoy running, and may also occur as a result of standing for the majority of the day. A common reason why heel pain can happen may be a result of a condition known as plantar fasciitis. This is a condition that affects the plantar fascia, which is located on the bottom of the foot, and connects the toes to the heels. Stress fractures may affect the heel, and generally come from repetitive motions that can include running and jumping activities. The Achilles tendon is located on the bottom of the calf, and links the heel to the calf muscles. Inflammation of this tendon is known as Achilles tendonitis, and can cause severe pain and discomfort. If you are experiencing heel pain for any reason, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible so the correct treatment can begin.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Friday, 27 March 2020 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Monday, 23 March 2020 00:00

How Is Morton’s Neuroma Diagnosed?

The pain that is typically associated with Morton’s neuroma is felt in the ball of the foot. Many patients often describe it as a sharp, burning pain, and it may feel like there is a small stone in your shoe. This condition may develop from wearing shoes that are too tight, or from participating in high impact activities. Additionally, people who have foot conditions that can include bunions and hammertoes, or who are significantly overweight, may also experience Morton’s neuroma. This ailment is defined as growths that form around the nerves between the second and third toes, and when pressure is added, may cause pain and discomfort. A proper diagnosis generally consists of having an MRI taken, as this may be effective in identifying unwanted growths. If you are afflicted with Morton's neuroma, it is strongly suggested that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can treat this condition.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
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