Monday, 03 August 2020 00:00

Treating Poor Circulation

Poor circulation in the feet is a common condition with potentially serious consequences. Symptoms of poor circulation can include tingling, numbness, pain, a pins and needles sensation, and muscle cramps in the feet and ankles. If you experience poor circulation in your feet, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist. A podiatrist can perform vascular testing to diagnose poor circulation. To manage your condition, the doctor may recommend lifestyle modifications, such as eating a balanced diet, doing light exercises, and quitting smoking. These changes can improve your circulation and reduce the risk of other cardiovascular complications, such as heart attack or stroke. The podiatrist may also prescribe medications or other treatments to increase blood flow to your legs and feet.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

Signs of Excessively Sweaty Feet

Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition that causes excessive sweating, often in specific areas of the body such as the feet. Excessive sweating typically begins in adolescence and may have genetic causes. It tends to affect both sides of the body equally. Signs and symptoms of hyperhidrosis of the feet include frequent, unexplainable sweating, clammy or wet soles, sweat-soaked socks and shoes, friction blisters, and a strong odor. Hyperhidrosis can also increase the risk of developing fungal infections of the feet and toenails, as fungus thrives in moist environments. If you find that your feet sweat excessively, visit a podiatrist who can help find the right treatment for you. 

If you are suffering from hyperhidrosis contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

Hyperhidrosis of the Feet

Hyperhidrosis is a rare disorder that can cause people to have excessive sweating of their feet. This can usually occur all on its own without rigorous activity involved. People who suffer from hyperhidrosis may also experience sweaty palms.

Although it is said that sweating is a healthy process meant to cool down the body temperature and to maintain a proper internal temperature, hyperhidrosis may prove to be a huge hindrance on a person’s everyday life.

Plantar hyperhidrosis is considered to be the main form of hyperhidrosis. Secondary hyperhidrosis can refer to sweating that occurs in areas other than the feet or hands and armpits. Often this may be a sign of it being related to another medical condition such as menopause, hyperthyroidism and even Parkinson’s disease.

In order to alleviate this condition, it is important to see your doctor so that they may prescribe the necessary medications so that you can begin to live a normal life again. If this is left untreated, it is said that it will persist throughout an individual’s life.

A last resort approach would be surgery, but it is best to speak with your doctor to find out what may be the best treatment for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Hyperhidrosis of the Feet
Saturday, 25 July 2020 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Monday, 20 July 2020 00:00

Heel Pain and Plantar Fasciitis

The plantar fascia is located on the sole of the foot, and its function is to connect the heel to the toes. The chronic foot condition that is known as plantar fasciitis can develop from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or from standing on hard surfaces for the majority of the day. This may cause the plantar fascia to become inflamed. A common symptom that patients often notice is severe heel pain that may be more pronounced in the morning after arising. An effective prevention technique can be stretching the calf muscles. This can be practiced by standing on a step, and gently lowering one heel at a time. Additionally, it may help to roll the affected foot on a tennis ball, and this may help to stretch the heel. If you are experiencing heel pain, it may be indicative of plantar fasciitis, and it is advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Monday, 13 July 2020 00:00

Possible Symptoms of Arthritic Feet

Many people may experience the condition that is known as arthritis in the feet and ankles. It can develop gradually, as the cartilage in the ankle becomes thinner. Inflammation typically accompanies arthritis, which may cause severe pain and discomfort. People may develop this ailment as a result of genetics, or existing medical conditions that can include blood disorders or poor circulation. Some of the symptoms that are associated with arthritis can consist of limited ankle mobility, various levels of pain, and stiffness in the ankle and foot joints. Additionally, weight loss, general fatigue, and sweating may be indicators of types of arthritis. If you are afflicted with arthritis in your feet, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose this condition and guide you toward the correct treatment plan.

Arthritis can be a difficult condition to live with. If you are seeking treatment, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Arthritic Foot Care  

Arthritis is a joint disorder that involves the inflammation of different joints in your body, such as those in your feet. Arthritis is often caused by a degenerative joint disease and causes mild to severe pain in all affected areas. In addition to this, swelling and stiffness in the affected joints can also be a common symptom of arthritis.

In many cases, wearing ill-fitting shoes can worsen the effects and pain of arthritis. Wearing shoes that have a lower heel and extra room can help your feet feel more comfortable. In cases of rheumatoid arthritis, the arch in your foot may become problematic. Buying shoes with proper arch support that contour to your feet can help immensely.

Alleviating Arthritic Pain

  • Exercises that stretch the foot can prevent further pain and injury and increase mobility
  • Most of the pain can be alleviated with anti-inflammatory drugs, heat, and topical medications
  • Massages can help temporarily alleviate pain.

It is best to see your doctor for the treatment that is right for your needs and symptoms. Conditions vary, and a podiatrist can help you determine the right method of care for your feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Arthritic Foot Care
Monday, 06 July 2020 00:00

Managing Bunions

Bunions can be extremely painful and appear as a bony bump at the base of the big toe joint. They can make walking difficult since they are able to turn the affected foot outward. Some signs that indicate a bunion has developed may include swelling of the big toe joint, calluses under the joint, or limited motion of the big toe. Improperly fitting shoes, especially ones with a narrow or pointed toe box, are said to be one of the largest causes of bunions. Therefore, wearing shoes that fit properly, particularly ones that have extra toe room, are essential in bunion prevention. Bunions may also develop as a result of the shape of your foot, a foot deformity, or even a medical condition, such as arthritis. If you feel pain or stiffness in the big toe joint it is possible a bunion is developing, and it is recommended that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist for professional care and treatment.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions

The ball of the foot is located between the arch of the foot and the toes, and it primarily contains metatarsal bones. While walking, weight is transferred from the heel to the ball of the foot, and an uneven weight transfer can cause pain and swelling in that area. As you get older, the fat pad at the bottom of the foot can wear away and cause shock to the ball of the foot. Pain in the ball of the foot can also be caused by high arches, obesity, arthritis, ill-fitting shoes, and wearing high heels too often. If you are looking to manage and limit this type of pain from becoming worse, please consult with a podiatrist for professional guidance.

Foot Pain

Foot pain can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you have a foot pain, consult with Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Causes

Foot pain is a very broad condition that could be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Corns
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Arthritis (such as Gout, Rheumatoid, and Osteoarthritis)
  • Flat Feet
  • Injury (from stress fractures, broken toe, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon ruptures, and sprains)
  • And more

Diagnosis

To figure out the cause of foot pain, podiatrists utilize several different methods. This can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the cause of the foot pain. Whether it is resting, staying off the foot, or having surgery; podiatrists have a number of treatment options available for foot pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Foot Pain
Thursday, 25 June 2020 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Monday, 22 June 2020 00:00

Two Types Of Heel Spurs

Patients who have developed a bone spur are often aware of the pain and discomfort it can cause. Heel spurs that develop on the bottom of the heel is classified as heel spur syndrome. When a bone spur forms at the back of the heel at the point where the Achilles tendon fits into the bone, it is known as insertional Achilles tendonitis. Heel spurs can develop as a result of frequently participating in running and jumping activities that can overstretch the plantar fascia. Limited range of motion can occur with Achilles tendonitis, and it may be more common among patients who are middle-age. If you have pain in your heel, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can diagnose heel spurs, and offer the correct treatment for you.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

Read more about Heel Spurs
Monday, 15 June 2020 00:00

Types of Ankle Sprains

A common injury among athletes is an ankle sprain. There are several types of ankle sprains that can occur. These can consist of injury to the ligaments on the outside of the ankle, which is called a lateral sprain. When the toes turn out while they are pointing up, the medial portion of the ankle can become hurt, and this type of sprain may take longer to heal. A sprain that occurs to the front or back ligaments is referred to as a syndesmotic sprain. Common symptoms that patients can experience with ankle sprains can include severe pain, swelling, and difficulty walking. Relief may be found when the impacted foot is elevated, as this may help to diminish a portion of the swelling. Additionally, existing bruising may be controlled when an ankle wrap is used, or a protective boot is worn. If you have sprained your ankle, it is strongly suggested that you speak with a podiatrist who can determine what the best treatment is for you.

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains
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