Tuesday, 12 November 2019 00:00

Achilles Tendon Injuries Can Cause Severe Pain

The Achilles tendon is found in the back of the calf, and it connects the calf muscles to the heel. This portion of tissue is instrumental in allowing the foot to point and flex, in addition to performing activities that include running, jumping, and walking. If the Achilles tendon becomes damaged as a result of a fall or injury, immediate and severe pain is often felt. There are common reasons why this type of injury may occur. These can consist of calf muscles that have not been stretched properly before beginning a new sport, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or increasing the intensity of a sporting activity. Many patients find the affected leg is painful in the morning upon arising, and it may become swollen as daily activities are pursued. There are specific stretches that can be performed which may bring moderate relief. If you are afflicted with an Achilles tendon injury, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who guide you toward proper treatment options.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Achilles Tendon Injuries

Many people spend the majority of their working day standing for extended periods of time. Research has indicated it is beneficial to perform specific types of stretches that can strengthen the muscles in the feet and legs. An effective calf stretch begins with standing against a wall, and extending one leg at a time in a backward direction, while standing flat on the floor. Additionally, it is helpful to wear shoes that fit correctly, and provide adequate support. Wearing socks that fit properly can be instrumental in keeping the feet dry, and preventing blisters. High heels should be avoided, and this may be helpful in preventing an Achilles tendon injury from occurring. If you are interested in obtaining additional information about how to choose shoes while working on your feet, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist. 

While working on the feet, it is important to take the proper care of them. For more information about working on your feet, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Working on Your Feet

Standing on your feet for long periods of time can cause stress and pain in your feet. Your whole body may experience change in terms of posture, back pain, bunions, callouses and or plantar warts. There are ways to avoid these conditions with proper foot care, smart choices and correct posture.

Positive Changes

Negative heeled shoe – Choosing this shoe type places the heel slightly lower than the ball of the foot. These are great for overall foot health. Find shoes that fit you correctly.

Go barefoot – Our feet were not designed to be enclosed for all hours of the day. Try to periodically expose your feet to air.

Eliminate Pain

Foot Exercises – Performing simple exercises, incorporating yoga and doing stretches are beneficial. This will allow increased blood flow to the area and muscles of the foot.

Achilles tendon – Stretching the foot out flat on the floor will relax the calf muscles and tendon. These exercises can be performed almost anywhere. Make sure you add these exercises to your daily regimen. 

With a little bit of this information and knowing more about foot health, you will notice changes. Foot stretches and proper footwear will help with pain and prevent further issues.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about How to Handle a Long Work Day on Your Feet

Living with foot pain is hard on your body.  Give us a call and let us find out what's wrong.

Tuesday, 29 October 2019 00:00

Children and Broken Toes

Some symptoms your child might be experiencing if they have a broken toe are swelling, redness, severe pain, and discomfort. These symptoms typically occur at the time of the injury. In more severe fractures, the bone may protrude from the skin, which is referred to as a dislocated bone. Broken toes can happen for a variety of reasons including: stubbing the toe against a piece of furniture, stepping off of a curb unexpectedly, or jamming it while participating in sporting activities. If the pain is extreme, an X-ray should be performed to determine the extent of the fracture. If your child has broken his or her toe, it is advised that you speak to a podiatrist who can discuss proper treatment options with you.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Monday, 21 October 2019 00:00

Teenagers and Sever's Disease

The medical condition that is referred to as Calcaneal Apophysitis is commonly known as Sever's disease. This disease occurs when the growth plate in the heel becomes swollen, and typically affects teenagers who participate in sporting activities. As growing occurs, muscles and tendons can put strain and pressure on the heel, possibly causing swelling and tenderness. An initial step in beginning treatment of this condition is to look out for high arches or flat feet that may be present. This may affect the way walking is done, and can be important to know so proper treatment techniques can begin. Mild relief may be found when gentle exercises are frequently performed that can promote mobility. Additionally, it may be beneficial to wear orthotics, as this may aid in the treatment of Sever's disease. If your child is suffering from this condition, it is strongly advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnosis and treat this condition.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Edwin S. Hart at Pennsylvania. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease

A common cause of poor circulation is a medical condition known as peripheral artery disease, otherwise known as PAD.  If this develops, the arteries and blood vessels in the legs may become narrow, and it may contribute to decreased blood flow to the legs. Some of the symptoms linked with this ailment can include nerve and tissue damage, and patients may feel tingling and numbing sensations. Research has indicated that there are a variety of reasons why poor circulation may develop. These can include medical conditions such as diabetes, Raynaud’s disease, and obesity may play a significant role in developing poor circulation. Some patients may benefit from wearing compression socks in addition to frequently elevating their feet. This may help to reduce any existing swelling. If you suffer from poor circulation, it is advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can guide you toward proper treatment options.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Monday, 07 October 2019 00:00

Possible Causes of Ingrown Toenails

When a toenail grows into the skin instead of over it, it is referred to as an ingrown toenail. The symptoms that are often accompanied with this condition can consist of tenderness, redness, and swelling. Common reasons for this condition to manifest may include wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in, cutting the toenail too short, or from an injury that has happened to the toe. Patients who have ingrown toenails that are not infected may find mild relief when the foot is soaked in warm water. This may enable you to gently move the nail away from the skin it has grown into. If you have developed this ailment, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly treat infected and uncomfortable ingrown toenails.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care
Monday, 30 September 2019 00:00

Strong Feet and the Sport of Running

Many patients who enjoy the sport of running understand the benefits of stretching before running begins, and after it has ended. Research has indicated it may help to strengthen the muscles in the feet and legs, and this may be advantageous in preventing many injuries. An effective stretch is known as toe curling, and this is helpful in maintaining strength in the top of the foot. Additionally, the foot can be trained to move certain toes individually, which is known as toe yoga. It is important to keep the ankles strong, and this can be accomplished by pointing and flexing the feet on a frequent basis. If you would like more information about the benefits of stretching the feet, please schedule a consultation with a podiatrist. 

Why Stretching is Important for Your Feet

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Edwin S. Hart from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first to determine if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous exercise, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising to ice and rest the foot. It is advised that you then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Stretch Your Feet
Sunday, 29 September 2019 00:00

Do your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately?

Monday, 23 September 2019 00:00

Possible Causes of Corns

A common reason patients develop corns on their feet may come from excess friction that is generally caused by wearing shoes and socks that do not fit correctly. Additionally, they can develop from standing for extended periods of time throughout the day. Corns appear to be a rough and yellowed portion of skin, and often causes pain and discomfort. They can develop in a few different places on the foot, which may include the bottom and sides of the feet. Patients may find partial relief when the foot is soaked in warm water, followed by using a hydrating lotion. This may help to soften the corn, and can possibly be reduced by using a pumice stone. If the corn is growing in size, it is suggested that you speak with a podiatrist who can suggest treatment techniques that are correct for you.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Edwin S. Hart of Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Bethlehem, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns: What Are They, and How Do You Get Rid of Them
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